Choosing the Best Care for a Loved One With Alzheimer’s

    Dementia

    It can be extremely difficult to watch a loved one progress through different stages of dementia. They may forget how to care for themselves. They may even forget who you are. It can be difficult to watch them forget everything that makes them who they once were. If you are dealing with a loved one and Alzheimers, the best thing that you can do is provide them with the best possible care. The best care can slow down the progression of the dementia and can ensure that they have the best memory care for their situation.

    Memory care to slow down progression

    There is currently no cure for dementia. However, different exercises and activities have proven to be successful in slowing down the symptoms of the disease. The brain is similar to the body. It needs to be regularly worked out, so that it does not lose its mental functioning. Memory care to slow down the progression of the disease includes stimulating conversations, reading, crossword puzzles, crafts, movies, music, and any other hobbies. Many assisted living facilities have entire programs dedicated to encouraging hobbies within the residents.

    Assistance with everyday activities

    A loss of daily tasks is common among dementia patients. They may forget to do every day grooming or cleaning tasks. They may require additional assistance to complete these tasks. One of the biggest advantages of nursing homes is their around the clock monitoring. They are there to assist the residents with those grooming and daily errand tasks. In fact, almost 40% of residents living in residential care facilities in 2010 received assistance with three or more activities related to daily living. Common activities that seniors may need assistance with include showering, bathing, brushing hair, nail care, toiletries, and cleaning of the home or room.

    Memory care for safety

    One of the biggest concerns among family members with a loved one and dementia is their safety. As the brain declines, important memories of location and emergency protocols do too. You may be worried about your loved one wandering from home and not knowing the way back. You may worry about them not knowing how to handle an emergency. In fact, this is the main reason that many family members choose to move a loved one to a skilled nursing home. The nursing home or assisted living center has staff available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. If an emergency occurs, they are there to respond immediately. The facilities are also set up with safety features that prevent residents from wandering away from the building.

    Memory care independent living

    Every dementia patient is different. One person might lose much of their memory within a couple of months, while another only forgets minor things for years. For this reason, some seniors prefer more of a transition assisted living option. This option is more of a memory care independent living. The senior still has the ability to live alone, but they are surrounded by a senior community. The houses are equipped with safety features and the entrances are gated for additional security. The current average age of retirement is 63. Many of those retired will deal with minimal dementia symptoms that only partially affect their ability to live alone.

    Dementia is a growing medical disease in our country. Current, 1 in every 8 people over the age of 65 in the United States has Alzheimer?s. Dementia itself is not a death sentence. It is also not a guarantee that you have to immediately move to a nursing home. Each dementia case is different. If you are a loved one with a family member showing early signs of dementia, consider providing them with the best memory care. Encourage them to increase their daily activities, including their favorite hobbies. If they require additional assistance with everyday tasks or you are concerned about their safety, an assisted living home may be ideal. Consider a transitional retirement community for those somewhere in the middle.